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April 2014 Health Newsletter

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» Chiropractic Care Beneficial For Disc Herniations

» Excess Protein - A Diabetic Risk
» Bedroom TV for Kids Increases Weight Gain

Chiropractic Care Beneficial For Disc Herniations


A recently published study has found chiropractic spinal manipulation provides beneficial effects for individuals with painful disc herniations. The study included 148 patients suffering from acute and chronic low back pain and leg pain with visible lumbar (lower back) disc herniations as seen on MRI. Patients were treated with chiropractic spinal manipulation - the most common treatment provided by chiropractors. Researchers reported significant improvements for all outcomes at all points of follow-up. At the 3 month mark, approximately 91% of patients were "improved" with 88% "improved" at the 1 year mark. Although acute patients improved faster by 3 months, 82% of chronic patients reported "improvement" with 89% "improved" at 1 year. Importantly, there were no adverse events reported from receiving their chiropractic care. If you are suffering from back pain, leg pain and/or have a known disc herniation, contact your local chiropractor for a consultation today.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. Volume 37, Issue 3, March 2014.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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Excess Protein - A Diabetic Risk


According to new research, individuals consuming excess protein, especially animal protein, are putting themselves at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have also shown higher levels of protein intake, especially red meats and processed meats, to be tied to long-term diabetes risk. Approximately 26,000 individuals were included in the study who on average ate 90 grams of protein per day. Those individuals who consumed the most overall protein, approximately 111 grams per day, increased their odds of developing diabetes by 17% as compared with those who ate the least amount of protein daily - 72 grams. When evaluating specifically animal based protein, those who consumed the most were 22% more likely to become diabetic compared with those eating the least amount; 78 grams vs 36 grams, respectively. According to researchers, plant based protein was not linked to diabetes. In fact, plant based proteins such as nuts, whole grains and legumes have been associated with a lower incidence of diabetes in past studies. Researchers recommended minimizing red meat consumption to no more than twice per week and keeping poultry and fish consumption to no more than 4 times per week. They also recommended minimizing cheese and processed meats and avoiding the consumption of skimmed milk and yogurt on an everyday basis.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Diabetes Care, online April 10, 2014.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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Bedroom TV for Kids Increases Weight Gain


As a parent, we want to make our children happy. We also want to ensure we're making good long-term decisions to keep them safe and set them up for a successful future. Researchers have found that allowing your child to have a TV in his or her bedroom is one of those things where the negatives truly do outweigh the positives, literally. Researchers have found those children with TVs in their bedrooms gain more weight than those without TVs. Specifically, researchers found that those children with TVs in their bedrooms gain an additional pound of bodyweight each year over those children with no bedroom TV. It is unknown if the weight gain is a result of sleep disruption which is known to cause weight gain, a result of less desire to participate in physical activity or even an increased exposure to television food advertising. However, with this data coming from 6,500 children aged 10 to 14 years, it's clear a TV in a child's bedroom is associated with unhealthy weight gain. Fortunately, it's a quick and simple fix - don't allow your child to have a bedroom TV or remove it if one exists. While it may be easier said than done, as loving parents who are responsible for the well being of our children, itís just part of our job description!


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Pediatrics, online March 3, 2014.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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